Monday, October 22, 2012

Four Days in Guantanamo



Four Days in Guantanamo is a documentary based on security camera footage from the Guantanamo Bay prison.
It shows an encounter between a team of Canadian intelligence agents and Omar Khadr, who in September 2012, was repatriated to serve out his sentence in Canada. Khadr served a total of 3619 days in Guantanamo.

Based on seven hours of video footage declassified by the Canadian courts, this documentary delves into the unfolding high-stakes game of cat and mouse between captor and captive over a four-day period.
Maintaining the surveillance camera style, this film analyses the political, legal and scientific aspects of a forced dialogue.
It is a shocking insight into psychological interrogation techniques and speaks to the fate of the facility Barack Obama, the US president, promised to close down but which, four years later, remains open.


Based on seven hours of video footage declassified by the Canadian courts, this documentary delves into the unfolding high-stakes game of cat and mouse between captor and captive over a four-day period.

Maintaining the surveillance camera style, this film analyses the political, legal and scientific aspects of a forced dialogue.

It is a shocking insight into psychological interrogation techniques and speaks to the fate of the facility Barack Obama, the US president, promised to close down but which, four years later, remains open.




An excerpt of the film is available to watch here.

About the film:

This intense documentary is based on seven hours of CCTV material from the interrogation of Canadian-born Omar Khadr, the youngest detainee at Guantanamo Bay. In February, 2003 Canadian security agents interrogated the teenager. This interrogation and the reports of his being tortured prior to arriving at the facility raised the level of scrutiny regarding the treatment of prisoners at this detention camp.

In July 2008, the video of the interrogation was ordered to be made available in a Canadian supreme court ruling that stated in part: “Interrogation of a youth, to elicit statements about the most serious criminal charges while detained in these conditions and without access to counsel, and while knowing that the fruits of the interrogations would be shared with the US prosecutors, offends the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects.”

This 15-year-old boy was taken into custody by the US authorities following a firefight in Afghanistan in September 2002. The battle between US special forces and fighters reportedly associated with al-Qaeda left Khadr severely wounded. In a sworn affidavit during his court case, Khadr testified that he was tortured after being taken into custody. A month later, Khadr was delivered to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Not long after he arrived, Canadian security agents spent four days interrogating him.

more HERE

1 comment:

wanrosaini said...

Many issues come rushing to my mind after reading this. Right or wrong is not important and there is no such thing as white or black. Everything is,apparently,grey. Then, the people involve in making the documentary, spending their money and putting in their best effort, are not Muslim and this may be so because Omar is a Canadian and the interests are perhaps, merely confined to basic and fundamental human rights issue. And so, Omar's story is not reflective of a slew of the "clash of civilisations issues Huttingtion theorised. And Muslims are too impoverished, weak and ignorant or are Muslims too preoccupied with mundane worldly pursuits of wealth accumulation and thus too busy to even care about gross and blatant injustices perpetrated upon their own brother of faith. Cruel cannot even begin to describe what the kuffars are inflicting onto Omar and other detainees in Guantanamo or elsewhere. We consciously choose to be ignorant and our lackadaisical attitude is glaring. We are exist much like the froth on the surface of weak waves beating mile long beaches.
On the day of judgment the ultimate verdict will be delivered and commensurating punishment awaits. I did not lift a finger to help Omar but i detested the despicable cruelty and torture inflicted on him.
Still, is mere sympathy enough?