Saturday, October 31, 2009

Malaysian Jockey on run with Kiwi's cash

RACING'S FORMER pin-up girl, Lisa Cropp, is understood to have been fleeced of almost $20,000 by a fellow banned rider who is believed to have fled the country last weekend using a stolen passport.

Lisa Cropp riding Sculptor returns to scale after winning race 3 the SAAB Quality during the AAMI Victoria Derby Day at Flemington.

Cropp, who won the jockey's premiership three years in a row and was later banned from riding for testing positive to methamphetamine, has laid a complaint over the missing money to Cambridge police and the TAB.

The complaint alleges Matamata apprentice jockey Mohammed Yusof, 32, originally from Malaysia, electronically transferred money several times in August and September from Cropp's personal account to his TAB account, and then withdrew almost $20,000 in the past couple of weeks. Yusof had also returned a positive methamphetamine test.

jock

CAUGHT OUT: Apprentice rider Mohammed Yusof faces a P charge.

Racing industry sources told the Sunday Star-Times that Yusof, his wife and three children, flew out of Auckland Airport last Saturday. Yusof is believed to have used the passport of another Malaysian jockey working for a separate Matamata stable.

Cambridge police detective Bill Crowe said an alert for the disgraced jockey had now been placed with Customs and he would be arrested should he return to New Zealand. Inquiries would also be made with Interpol. Bryan McKenzie, a Waikato-based investigator with New Zealand Thoroughbred Racing (NZTR), said he was liaising with police, Immigration and the TAB over Yusof and his recent whereabouts.

In August Yusof returned a positive test to methamphetamine and was banned from riding for nine months.

He had been a promising jockey, riding 12 winners last season after a break of two years, but McKenzie said he had previously been suspended from racing for misconduct, relating to two separate assaults on stablehands.

"He certainly didn't enjoy a good reputation among the racing fraternity and the New Zealand racing industry is well rid of him," McKenzie said.

Cropp, who refused to comment, is no stranger to controversy herself, after fighting a four-year battle over her positive drug test.

She was disqualified from riding for nine months in June, fined $7500 and ordered to pay $92,000 in costs. But she has failed to respond to demands for payment of the money and has been placed on racing's unpaid forfeit list, which is a register of people disqualified from all racing codes here and overseas. NZTR is seeking repayment of the money through civil action.

Cropp rode about 430 winners between testing positive in May 2005 to methamphetamine and being banned in June. She earned $947,748 in riding percentages from the day she tested positive.

The incident with Yusof comes just weeks after the Matamata equine community was rocked by the violent death of 42-year-old Helen Meads, who was shot dead on her property in late September.

Her husband, well-known horse breeder Greg Meads, has been charged with her murder.

The Old Silk Road Festival

This is definitely in my 'things to do before I die' list, traveling through ancient and historical Silk Road.
http://www.theorientalcaravan.com/images/silk_road/mapasia.jpg

Waypoint on the old Silk Road


By Gail Simmons

If the Great Umayyad Mosque in Damascus is the city’s beating heart, then the Al-Hamidiyeh souk is its coronary artery. Leading from the Roman arch by the mosque, you can find everything here from the exotic to the kitsch: narghile water pipes, gold jewellery, rugs, saucy underwear, stuffed birds of prey, inlaid wood, glitzy gowns and, everywhere, silk.

And among the piles of scarves for sale to tourists you can still see bolts of the damask cloth that gave this city fame throughout the world, echoing its former importance on the Silk Road: a trade route that began with the discovery some 5,000 years ago in China that the excretions of a humble little caterpillar could be transformed into the planet’s most durable, desirable and luxurious fabric.

Soon the whole civilised world wanted silk, and to meet the demand a network of routes developed that spanned three millennia and 12,000km to Rome, where it was highly prized among the glitterati of the Empire. Along the way the route passed through the lands we now know as Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Syria, Lebanon and Turkey, with subsidiary routes joining from Central Asia and even as far as India before reaching the Mediterranean coast from where goods were shipped to Rome. It was the single most enduring and important trading route in history.


Merchandise travelling on the Silk Road from the Chinese city of X’ian to Rome could take months or even years to reach its final destination; I had only one week and my own journey began not among the walls and pagodas of X’ian but amid the minarets and domes of Damascus, where I had been invited to attend Syria’s annual Silk Road Festival. Running since 2002, the festival seeks to remind the world of Syria’s key role on the Silk Road, and its unique place on the crossroads between East and West.

Now, the crumbling palaces, winding alleys and historic churches and mosques of old Damascus are increasingly squeezed by the traffic-choked highways and high-rise sprawl of the modern city, and smoke-filled cafes jostle with designer bars populated by both Damascenes and foreigners, language students, employees of non-governmental organisations, writers and artists: the usual driftwood of a global city.

Almost within living memory, however, Damascus was surrounded by orchards that acted as the city’s lungs, keeping the air cool and fresh even in the heat of summer. Everywhere the heady fragrance of jasmine drifted on the breezes. So lovely was Damascus that, according to Islamic tradition, the Prophet Mohammed, as a young merchant on a trip to Syria, refused to enter the gates after spying the city from afar, declaring that he only wished to enter Paradise once.


When he travelled to Syria in the 6th century the Silk Road was reaching its apogee, and Damascus was already a great city, reaching its peak as capital of the Umayyad caliphate after the Islamic conquests of 634.

The orchards are gone now, and jasmine struggles with toxic traffic fumes, though you can still feel a glimmer of wonder as you look down upon Damascus from Jebel Kassioun at sunset, as the muezzins proclaim the Maghreb prayers from green-glowing minarets and the city is spread before you in all her faded splendour, an ancient countess decked out in the family heirlooms.

Heading east out of Damascus towards the Silk Road city of Palmyra, the ambience of the ancient route is hard to recapture as you first pass a huge cement factory, setting the scene for the next few kilometres before you enter the badia, or steppe. Eventually the half-built breeze-block villages die away as the road pierces a barren landscape of yellow hills and arid plains, shrouded with a haze of heat and dust. This, at last, is the landscape that would have greeted the caravans of traders on the Silk Road who for centuries traversed the desert from east to west, carrying not only silk but spices and perfume, ebony and slaves, arts and science, languages and ideas, philosophies and faiths, diseases and their cures.

How welcome would have been the sight of a caravanserai emerging on the horizon, indistinguishable at first from the rock and rubble of the steppe. And how refreshing the cool, shaded interior where exhausted travellers and their camels could be fed, watered and rested.

Near Palmyra we stopped at the caravanserai’s modern equivalent, the Baghdad Cafe on the main road to Iraq. In the days of the Silk Road this was Mesopotamia, and although the caravans have today been replaced by the garishly painted lorries plying the route between Iraq and the Mediterranean, their cargo of oil is just as precious as the treasures of the Silk Road’s heyday, and our cafe stopover just as welcome.

Back on the road, the ruined city of Palmyra emerges as a dark stain on the monochrome desert like spilt tea, which soon becomes identifiable as the vast palm oasis that gives the city its name and where the ruins now lie scattered. Lying halfway between the old Silk Road city of Dura Europos on the Euphrates (now on the border with Iraq) and the Mediterranean coast, Palmyra, the “Queen of the Desert” was the most significant stop on the Silk Road in Syria and is now one of the grandest archaeological sites of the Middle East.

Palmyra existed as an oasis settlement from 2,000BC but flourished as the Silk Road traders passed through, reaching its zenith in the first century AD. It is estimated that the price of merchandise increased a hundred fold between its place of origin and Rome, where there was enormous demand for these exotic eastern goods. This is how Palmyra made her fortune. By charging levies on the goods that passed through the city (you can still see the tariffs charged on an inscribed stone, now displayed at the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg), she was able to splash out on magnificent temples, streets, villas, baths and theatres. All was going swimmingly until Zenobia, Palmyra’s 3rd-century warrior queen, launched a series of assaults on the Roman Empire, leading to the city being sacked. Zenobia was ultimately captured and taken to Rome in chains, and Palmyra’s fortunes never recovered.

The aridity of the desert climate, and the happy fact that the modern town of Tadmor developed well away from the ruins, has preserved Palmyra’s deeply romantic atmosphere. The centrepiece of the city is the Sanctuary of Bel, a monumental temple built between the second and third centuries AD and dedicated to the same pagan god worshipped at Baalbek, in present-day Lebanon. In the late afternoon I wandered among the tumbled columns and massive blocks of the ruined temple, still lying just where they’d fallen, their decorations still as crisp as the day they were carved. This seems a city built by giants for giants on a scale that still impresses us humans even in our age of skyscrapers and jumbo jets.

As the sun set, and the stones of the ruins glowed pink with the day’s stored heat, I climbed to the Qal’at Ibn Ma’an, the medieval fortress perched on a hill overlooking the Valley of the Tombs. These funerary towers were usually built for many generations of one family whose members were buried in niches, the mummies wrapped in silks carried from China and now displayed in Palmyra’s museum. Looking down at the city below, I could almost see the merchants in their colourful dress, haggling, swapping stories and exchanging views; I could almost hear the indignant snorts of camels as they were being loaded, and smell the spices mixed with dung and dust. Almost.

But Palmyra was more than a centre where money changed hands and the caravans recuperated on their long journey west. Palmyra, like the entire Silk Road, was the original global village. It was a meeting place where ideas were exchanged, cultures mixed and artistic influences spread, though what we now call the Silk Road was only named as such in the 19th century.

Nor was the Silk Road even one highway, but a series of routes with many branches and deviations, like a river with numerous tributaries that ebbed and flowed with the tides of history, or shifting like the desert dunes according to the political and security circumstances of the time. From Dura Europos an early tributary travelled from Palmyra south-west towards the commercial centre of Damascus, where the goods were worked and locally sold, or to Homs and the Mediterranean.

But after the fall of Palmyra, when the desert crossing became impossible, the Silk Road traders found a more northerly tributary from Dura Europos following the course of the Euphrates towards Aleppo, from where the route led to the Mediterranean at Antioch (modern Antakya), or continued overland to Constantinople (Istanbul) before crossing the sea. And Aleppo – via Homs – was my next destination in pursuit of the silk caravans.

The road from Palmyra towards Homs quickly enters open badia, and we passed low mud-brick settlements alongside their modern breeze-block counterparts and scattered Bedouin encampments, a remnant of a way of life fast dying out. The occasional goatherd with his flock, seeking sustenance in the sparse vegetation, drifted across the landscape, and I saw one huge herd of camels numbering perhaps one hundred, their unhurried, aristocratic gait perfectly adapted to their desert environment. Stopping by a Bedouin tent, we were invited in for tea and were able to admire close-up the traditional tattoo decoration on the old matriarch’s face.

As the route nears Homs the landscape transforms, the featureless badia giving way to low hills planted with olives, pines, vines and orchards growing in rich, red soil – an almost Mediterranean scene. The city of Homs grew where the route crossed the Orontes river which, along with the Euphrates and Tigris, formed the heart of the Fertile Crescent, where civilisation began. After Dura Europos and Palmyra, Homs was the next major stop on the Silk Road and the last before reaching the Mediterranean at Lattakia. Known then as Emessa, the city’s modern claim to fame is as Syria’s foremost industrial centre and it’s hard to recapture the romance of the Silk Road here today.

From Homs the ancient route passed through the Homs Gap, dominated by the immense Crusader castle of Krak des Chevaliers, described by TE Lawrence as “the best-preserved and most wholly admirable castle in the world”. Built on the site of an earlier Islamic “Castle of the Kurds”, most of the current fabric of the castle dates from the 12th and 13th centuries, when the traffic on the Silk Road was waning.

As we neared the fortress, roosted high on a spur of the Jebel Alawi, we contoured steep hillsides, still green in October, where terraces of fruit trees rose above valleys strewn with Christian churches. The castle, though now surrounded by the modern town, does not disappoint, and I lost myself for hours among the curtain walls, ramparts and towers that make up this most evocative of medieval fortresses.

From Krak des Chevaliers we swung north to Aleppo. Vying with Damascus as the world’s oldest city – in Arabic its name is Halab, derived from the word for milk as the Prophet Abraham is said to have milked his cow on the Citadel here – it has long been Syria’s prime commercial centre, a major axis on the northerly route of the Silk Road in Syria. Aleppo remained an important metropolis even when, by the 16th century, the opening of new maritime routes between Europe and the Far East saw the eventual decline of the overland Silk Road.

Even today Aleppo has a cosmopolitan feel, a city where Kurds, Armenians, Arabs, Albanians, Circassians and many other ethnic groups live and trade together. The Silk Road may be no more, but everywhere I found reminders of its past commercial and military glories, not least in the labyrinthine souk – the longest covered market in the Middle East – and in the Citadel, from which I watched the sun set as the call to prayer vibrated over the domes and towers of the city. From Aleppo the Silk Road flowed on towards the sea, but I was at my journey’s end.

If I had more time I’d have headed further east to Dura Europos on the Iraqi border and further west to Lattakia and Antakya on the Mediterranean, traversing the Silk Road in Syria from end to end. No doubt these places will still be here next time I visit. But ultimately Syria for me is more than the sum of its monuments and archaeological sites, the remains of its 30 consecutive civilisations. Syria’s key position on the Silk Road has seen it welcome strangers from all corners of Europe and Asia, and the hospitality and kindness of the Syrian people is renowned the world over.

The Silk Road Festival might showcase the best of Syria’s heritage, the cities and cultures that grew around the trade in silk. But the true spirit of the country is captured in the fact that for over 2,000 years, Syria has prided itself as a place where people willingly share their heritage and their homes with passing strangers – whether these be caravans of silk and other treasures, or modern travellers on the Silk Road trail.

travel@thenational.ae

Friday, October 30, 2009

Careers - UAE University in Al Ain & American University Dubai

UAEU Careers Homepage

Here you'll find links to jobs at UAEU, internships, volunteer positions, projects, college opportunities and general careers information for students, & UAEU graduates.

Learn about Opportunities & Apply

Career Opportunities at UAEU Jobs

UAEU PhD Program

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Human Resources : Employment : Opportunities

Full-time Faculty Opportunities

Chair of Liberal Arts

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Full-Time Administrative Opportunities

Admissions Coordinator


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Careers at Abu Dhabi University

Careers at Abu Dhabi University

ACADEMIC VACANCIES

College of Business Administration
Faculty Positions - Various Disciplines
Part-Time: (Al-Ain Campus) Teaching Assistant/Tutor - MIS - February 2009

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Master or Ph.D. Holder in Interior Design, Architecture or a related field
Ph.D. Holder in Civil Engineering - specialization is Materials and Structural Engineering
Teaching Assistant/ Lab Technician in Civil Engineering

Provost's Office
Manager of the Center for Instructional Development

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Instructor - Sociology
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Alumni Relations Manager
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Finance
Accounts Receivable Accountant
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Assistant Professor in Translation
Teaching Assistants/ Tutors : Abu Dhabi / Al Ain : Part Time and/or Full Time
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Assistant Librarian

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Career Opportunities - Zayed University (Abu Dhabi & Dubai)

Proudly bearing the name of the founder of the nation - the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan - Zayed University was founded in 1998 to inspire, encourage, educate, and lead a powerful generation of students.

2009 heralds a new milestone for Zayed University as the University welcomes UAE Nationals, UAE residents, and international students to campuses for men and women in Abu Dhabi, Dubai - Al Ruwayyah, and Dubai - Knowledge Village. Accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, the University’s programs are recognized internationally as coming from a quality assured university. So, you can be sure that your degree is not only highly regarded in the UAE, not only in the GCC, but globally.



"An opportunity to be part of a growing university in a growing country"

Academic Bridge Program
Instructors - January and August 2010
Bilingualism Center
Applied Linguistics Researchers (Assistant, Associate, Full Professors) - Abu Dhabi
College of Arts & Sciences
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor, Abu Dhabi Campus - Anthropology or History - January/August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor, Dubai Campus - Anthropology, History or Cultural Studies - January/August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor, Dubai Campus - World Literature - January 2010
Part-time Instructors - Global Awareness - Abu Dhabi and Dubai - February 2010
College of Business Sciences
Assistant, Associate and Full Professors - Financial and Managerial Accounting - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate and Full Professors - Operations Management - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate and Full Professors -Accounting - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor - Business Communications - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor - Economics - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor - Finance - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor - Human Resources Management - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor - Management - January and August 2010
Assistant, Associate or Full Professor - Marketing - January and August 2010
College of Communication & Media Sciences
Adjunct Faculty - Abu Dhabi and Dubai - Spring 2010 Semester
Library & Learning Resource Centres
Reference and Instructional Support Librarian - (Temporary – Full or Part-time) - Abu Dhabi and Dubai
University College
Instructors/Assistant, Associate or Full Professors - Rhetoric and Composition, Abu Dhabi/Dubai - Department of Languages
Adjunct Instructors, Department of Languages
Adjunct Instructors, Department of Mathematics and Statistics

» Click here for helpful instructions on how to apply.

Bilingualism Center
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College of Arts & Sciences
Chair - Humanities and Social Sciences
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Library & Learning Resource Centres
University Archivist - January 2010
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» Click here for helpful instructions on how to apply.

Academic Bridge Program
Administrative Assistant -Academic Bridge Program - Abu Dhabi - (U.A.E. Nationals Only)
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Temporary Administrative Support Opportunities - Abu Dhabi
Temporary Administrative Support Opportunities - Dubai
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Part-time Switchboard Operator - Dubai (U.A.E. Nationals Preferred)
College of Business Sciences
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Administrative Assistant- Abu Dhabi (UAE National Only)
College of Information Technology
Temporary Laboratory Technician, Abu Dhabi
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University College
Administrative Assistant - University College -Abu Dhabi
Academic Advisors/First Year Experience Faculty, Abu Dhabi/Dubai - Department of Advising and Academic Development

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Thursday, October 29, 2009

Career Opportunities - American University of Sharjah

About AUS

American University of Sharjah (AUS) was founded in 1997 by His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan Bin Mohammad Al Qassimi, Member of the Supreme Council of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Sharjah, who envisioned the university as a leading educational institution in the Gulf region. American University of Sharjah is an independent, not-for-profit coeducational institution. Although consciously based on upon American institutions of higher education, AUS is also expected to be thoroughly grounded in Arab culture and to be part of a larger process of the revitalization of intellectual life in the Middle East. AUS is emerging as a leading comprehensive coeducational university in the Gulf, serving students from the region and around the world.

American University of Sharjah is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 215 662 5606). AUS is also licensed by the UAE Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, and all undergraduate and graduate programs are recognized by the ministry and have been awarded either accreditation or accreditation-eligible status. All six of the bachelor degree programs in the AUS College of Engineering are accredited by ABET of the United States.

AUS offers 26 majors and 42 minors at the undergraduate level, and 13 master's degrees programs through the following academic divisions:

While Arabic is the official language of the United Arab Emirates, the language of instruction at AUS is English. All classes and administrative functions are conducted in English.




Faculty positions for College of Arts and Sciences


Faculty Positions for College of Engineering

The American University of Sharjah (AUS) is a non-profit, coeducational institution of higher education formed on the American model. Student applicants are considered on the basis of their qualifications regardless of race, color, gender, religion, disabilities, age or national origin. The medium of instruction is English. The curricula of the programs are based on the American model of liberal education and include a strong general education requirement. AUS is licensed in the United Arab Emirates. It is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. All College of Engineering programs are accredited by ABET. Currently, the College of Engineering has over 2000 students and 70 full-time faculty members. Please visit www.aus.edu for more information.
Full time faculty appointments are required in the following disciplines and areas of specialization. Strong preference is given to candidates with degrees (BS, MS, PhD) from a western-style university that is ABET (or equivalent) accredited. Teaching experience in an American model of higher education and work experience in North American industry are highly desirable. One-year visiting faculty appointments at all academic ranks are also welcome.

Chemical Engineering: The department is seeking applicants for Visiting Professor in all areas with preference for biomedical engineering, catalysts or bio-fuels.

Please send applications to: soeche@aus.edu

Civil Engineering: All areas of the discipline including: construction management, structures, transportation, geotechnical, water resources and environmental engineering.

Please send applications to: soecve@aus.edu

Electrical Engineering: The department is seeking applicants at the Assistant Professor rank in the following areas: Electromagnetic and Microelectronics.

Please send applications to: soeele@aus.edu

Mechanical Engineering: The department is seeking applicants at the Assistant or Associate Professor rank in the fields of renewable energy in general and fuel-cells specifically, thermofluids, materials, dynamics, design, MEMS, NEMS and bio-fuels.

Please send applications to: soemce@aus.edu

For permanent appointments, initial contracts are normally for three years and are renewable. Rank will be determined by previous employment history. Faculty at AUS receive competitive pay and an attractive benefits package. There is no income tax in the United Arab Emirates.

Interviews will be held at various sites. Positions are open until filled with preference to early applicants. Faculty who are appointed must be in Sharjah by January 20, 2010 for spring appointments and September 17, 2010 for Fall appointments.
For more information: www.aus.edu

Faculty Positions for the School of Business & Management

Last Updated September 27, 2009


Job Ad for the Department of Economics

AF All Fields

Q5 - Natural Resource Economics

E5 - Monetary Economics

P - Islamic Economics and Finance

P5 - Comparative Economic Systems

K00 - Law and Economics

All Ranks

Pending budgetary approval, the Department of Economics invites applications at all ranks for openings in continuing positions. Fields are open, with preference for those listed. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Economics, publications commensurate with rank, and experience in teaching in English. For retention, faculty must publish in reputable, peer-reviewed, English-language journals. Starting date is September 2010.

Located outside Sharjah City near Dubai, AUS is an American model university with independent U.S. accreditation by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. Compensation is competitive and free of UAE taxes. Departmental representatives will conduct interviews at the January 3-5, 2010 ASSA Annual Meeting in Atlanta. All applications received by December 1, 2009 are assured full consideration. Applications should include a curriculum vita, addresses (including e-mail) for a minimum of three references, and a letter of application. Only short listed candidates will be contacted.

Send applications by e-mail to Dean, School of Business and Management at deanofsbm@aus.edu

Assessment Coordinator

Job Responsibilities:

  • Coordinate and support educational assessment efforts at the course and program levels.
  • Work with faculty to identify and develop strategies for assessing goals and outcomes.
  • Develop/implement assessment activities.
  • Conduct workshops for faculty and administrators.
  • Promote the importance of assessment in evaluation and improvement.

Requirements

  • Advanced degree in curriculum, assessment, educational leadership or other appropriate academic field; a doctorate is preferred.
  • Experience in planning and implementing assessment programs
  • Knowledge of accreditation requirements for assessment
  • Experience working in a diverse multicultural environment
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Demonstrated ability to work with faculty from a variety of disciplines.

To apply, please submit a CV and cover letter to Ms. Maria Malik (mmalik@aus.edu).

All material should be submitted in a single PDF file labeled: Assessment_Coordinator_ApplicantsSurname.pdf

Chemistry Laboratory Specialist (CLS)

The CLS will carry out a variety of laboratory related activities. These include preparing experimental set-ups, calibration and maintenance of equipment, performance of analytical and other measurements requested by the department, preparation of materials for classroom demonstrations, inventory maintenance, safe storage and disposal of chemicals. The CLS also assists in departmental tasks as assigned by the laboratory supervisor and the department head. Preference will be given to applicants with skills in the use of advanced instrumentation such as GC-MS, ICP, FTIR, IC and NMR.

The successful candidate will have a B.S. degree in chemistry, good communications skills in English, and at least three years of experience in a similar position.

To apply, please send the CV to cashr@aus.edu

Chemistry Laboratory Instructor (CLI)

The CLI will carry out a variety of laboratory related activities. These include supervision of laboratory sessions which could involve the use of advanced analytical equipment such as NMR, HPLC, GC-MS, IC and ICP, giving pre-laboratory presentations, and grading reports and quizzes. The CLI also assists in departmental tasks as assigned by the laboratory supervisor and the department chair

The successful candidate will have a M.S. degree in chemistry, good communications skills in English, and at least three years of experience in a similar position.


To apply, please send the CV to cashr@aus.edu

Senior Network Engineer

Job Descriptions:

This individual will interact closely with American University of Sharjah's community educational initiatives for connectivity to regional institutions. Capable of monitoring and analyzing network activity, providing maximum network bandwidth, quality of service, and security in a highly active environment. Provide technical design consulting, and capacity planning, to the departments (organizations) regarding use of computers and networks to satisfy business and research needs. Lead and/or guide other IT staff in providing tier three support, problem resolution tracking, and training for staff. The Network Architect is expected to develop and maintain documentation of systems, operational procedures and infrastructure topology, while participating in Information Technology related policies and procedures. This individual must have excellent interpersonal skills, as well as excellent oral and written communication skills.

Job Functions:

  • Design and maintain Cisco Powered Campus Networks
  • Work with IT Director, Academic and Administrative leaders to utilize campus infrastructure to its fullest
  • Provide technical leadership and guidance for other Network Engineers
  • Research software and hardware solutions to resolve University needs
  • Monitor and analyze network activity
  • Build and maintain documentation of devices, operational procedures and infrastructure topology
  • Assist in defining IT related policies and procedures
  • Assist in any other duties as required by the IT Director

Qualifications:

  • Cisco Certification (CCNP or above) with minimum of 3 years of experience in large networks (> 10,000 nodes)
  • Significant knowledge and Experience with management and design of large scale enterprise or campus networks
  • Knowledge and experience in Network Security
  • In-depth understanding of IP Protocols, network convergence, and service delivery to multi-platform environment
  • Strong troubleshooting capabilities
  • Proven track record of mentoring junior network engineers towards advancement
  • Demonstrated experience with Cisco switches and routers
  • Experience working for, or with, large network service providers
  • Expertise in BGP, OSPF, Multicast, and multi-layer routing
  • Expertise in QoS architectures and implementation
  • Significant experience in Wireless management and security
  • Knowledge of IPv6
  • Expertise in network preparation and management in support of IP Telephony
  • Experience with CiscoWorks / IOS


Disabilities Coordinator/Academic Advisor:

The Disabilities Coordinator/Academic Advisor assists AUS students with physical and learning disabilities in making an effective and efficient transition to the American University of Sharjah. The advisor works closely with fellow advisors, faculty, and campus support services to ensure that student needs are met. The Disabilities Coordinator will coordinate and report on all infrastructures, programs, policies and procedures related to disabilities across the university.

Job Responsibilities:

• Work directly with disabled students to aid their transition to AUS

• Coordinate and report on all infrastructure, programs, policies and procedures related to disabilities

• Advise students individually and in groups on academic matters including course selection, study skills, time management, and decision-making, etc.

• Refer students to the appropriate AUS office, faculty, and support services as needed

• Advise students during orientation sessions

• Provide support to students through their transition to AUS

• Work with faculty to improve student success in academic matters

• Initiate meetings with students on probation to discuss their progress

• Work closely with fellow advisors in developing a retention plan for students

• Contribute to the development of academic advising through involvement in the Academic Advising Committee and in-service training activities

• Collect data on student needs and on the effectiveness of the disabilities program

• Perform related duties as required

Required Qualifications

• Master’s Degree or higher in Counseling, Learning Disabilities, or a closely related field

• Experience in working with students with disabilities

• Ability to learn AUS requirements, policies, and procedures

• Excellent organizational and time management skills

• Excellent interpersonal, speaking, and writing skills

• Knowledge of computers

• Ability to work as a team player

• Fluency in both English and Arabic is an asset

AP Accountant – Grants, Contracts and Endowments

Job Responsibilities:

  • Liaise with the Office of Research on all contracts and Grants related information and ensure finance records are well-run. Also work closely and liaise with the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs and the Scholarship Office to ensure endowment funds records are up to date.
  • Process banner system invoices/payments related to grants & contract reimbursements.
  • Ensure right approvals and correct accounts are used when processing payments.
  • Prepare monthly faculty consulting payments to be paid through the monthly payroll.
  • Ensure university policies related to outside consulting contracts are adhered to at all times.
  • Correspond with faculty if AUS invoices are required to be sent to 2nd party clients.
  • Regularly follow- up that contract client invoice payments are received and correct charge codes are used in A/R records.
  • Generate reports to reconcile budget status for each grant/contract.
  • prepare an annual report in May detailing the number and AED amount of grants and consulting contracts, by school/college, for the preceding 12 months and detailing the amount of Indirect Cost (IDC) Recovery funds, opening balance plus additions, and expenditures from the dean’s office account.
  • Process JV for the distribution of the yearly IDC percentage allocation to various AUS recipient organization.
  • Maintain proper and complete records for all endowment funds. Provide estimates for the pay-out amount from each endowment funds using the pay-out rate approved by AUS. Prepare annual, and upon request, reports on endowment fund movements.
  • The above is in addition to the regular accounts payable responsibilities

REQUIREMENTS/QUALIFICATIONS

  • Bachelor’s degree in Accounting , Finance or a related field
  • Proficiency with Microsoft Office and working knowledge of computers and accounting software.
  • Excellent communication skills, verbal and written, in order to deal with stakeholders (internal and external) at all levels.
  • Proven ability to communicate in written and spoken English
  • Strong organization and time management skills to ensure meeting scheduled deadlines.

PERFORMANCE COMPETENCIES

  • Deals effectively with various stakeholders, exercising high standards of customer service.
  • Organizes workload, sets priorities and work is performed accurately within deadlines.
  • Maintains confidentiality of financial and personal information.

Dormitory Supervisor (Male)

Job Descriptions:

Serves the assigned Dormitory and ensures welfare and safety of residing students and protection of University assets. In addition, provides counseling & guidance to dorm residents, receives visitors, attends to reception office at the dormitories, and ensures implementation of rules, regulations and disciplinary code in the conduct of students in the Dormitory. Maintains relevant files & records.

Qualifications and Skills:

The successful candidate shall have a four-year degree with a minimum of 5 years relevant experience in the field. Computer literate, proficient in MS Office Systems, fluency in English is a must & Arabic is an asset. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills are essential.

Driver

Duties:

  • Drive AUS community on campus and off campus as per operational requirements.
  • Meet, Greet & Provide appropriate transport facility.
  • Regular check battery fluid, break oil, breaks, coolant, engine oil, tire pressure etc...
  • Provides clean and efficient service and to take care of AUS vehicles.

Requirements:

  • The incumbent must have a UAE Driving License for light vehicle and heavy bus.
  • Not less than 4 years Experience in UAE as a Bus Driver.
  • Knowledge of using safety & security procedures is an advantage.

Qualifications:

  • High school diploma
  • Excellent communication skills (oral and written) in English
  • Excellent customer service skills


If interested, applicants should submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae with the names of three references to recruitment@aus.edu. The position applied for should be mentioned in the email subject line.

Note: For Temporary Part-time positions the candidates must already be in possession of a residence visa for the UAE; Candidates who are employed in the UAE must provide the university with a 'letter of no objection' from their current employer, which have the appropriate governmental approvals. Employment Visas are not provided to temporary staff.

Short-listed candidates only will be contacted. Applicants who do not meet specified requirements will not be shortlisted.

AUS Alumni are encouraged to apply for these positions

This company is an equal opportunity employer. We adhere to a policy of making employment decisions without regard to race, color, age, sex, religion, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, or marital status. We assure you that your opportunity for employment with us depends solely upon your qualifications.

NOTICE TO APPLICANTS: AUS complies with the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. During the interview process, you may be asked questions concerning your ability to perform job-related functions. If you are given a conditional offer of employment, you may be required to complete a post-job offer medical history questionnaire and undergo a medical examination, and all information will be kept confidential and in separate files.

Postal:
American University of Sharjah, Human Resource Services
P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah U.A.E., Fax: 06-5152139
short-listed candidates Only will be contacted within 6 weeks of their application


Trans World Expedition by Driving around the world

This is definitely among 'things to do before I die' list. Time, money, energy, health and other risks would be obstacles, not to include safety in this mad world. Those with excess of wealth can travel first class to every corner of the world, even blazing up to the sky as astronauts.

Be adventurous. Dare to take the risks. My last most memorable travel was in the States and Canada, hopping from a city to another within 3 weeks on very limited budget. Across the USA and final stop in Hawaii.

Another memorable travel was on hitch-hiking around North Island of New Zealand in 7 days. Once I had to walk 20 km stretch in the Middle earth (somewhere between Ohope in Bay of Plenty and Rotorua), with no human and vehicles on sight. I thought I would have to sleep on the road side without food and water until a truck driver stopped in dark evening. In truly Kiwi friendly gesture, he offered me, a stranger who he thought was a Japanese guy) to stay at his house by Rotorua lake with good fresh home-cooked dinner.

I believe a trip like this is something many people dream of. When you’re young and a student, you don’t have money to travel, but when you’re working and can afford it, you don’t have time.



By Nicolas Rapp
In November, I’ll be quitting my job and heading out on one of the last true adventures left on earth: Driving around the world.

I’ll spend about a year on the road, starting and finishing in New York. When I can’t drive, I’ll ship the car by boat, then fly to the next stop to pick it up.

The route is sinuous. Cross Central America, then head down South America to Buenos Aires. From there, I’ll ship the car to South Africa, then drive north through Africa to Europe.
I’m a native of France, so I’ll stop in Paris to get some paperwork done, then go east through Eastern Europe, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, and India. I’ll ship the car to Thailand, drive to Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia and Indonesia, and put the car on a final sailing home to the US.
My blog about the trip, where I’ll post updates from the road, is called “Trans World Expedition: The year of living dangerously.” I hope it will be a good tool for people who want to do a similar trip.

It is scary to leave your loved ones, your career, your apartment and people you know to have a year of waking up in unfamiliar places. Many people think I’m insane to quit my job when the economy is so bad. But I’m 33 and I’ve worked since age 18. I came to New York as an artist and ended up as an art director. It’s early enough in my life that I can take a year off, then come back, hopefully pick up my career and start a family.

I believe a trip like this is something many people dream of. When you’re young and a student, you don’t have money to travel, but when you’re working and can afford it, you don’t have time. I always thought I would buy a place in New York, but when you think about it, is there a better investment than traveling around the world? Wouldn’t you be smarter after doing that? Wouldn’t you have incredible stories to tell your kids and grandkids?

The route
My path will change depending on places I discover, tips, climate, where I can catch a boat, driving conditions, and visas. Staying out of trouble will also determine my route and how long I stay in one place.
Driving around the world may be more difficult now than it was in the 1960s, even though cars are more reliable and roads are better. Wars and civil unrest have eased in Latin America, but the crossing the Middle East is now a challenge. Here are some problems I’ll face:

• Darien Gap: This 100-mile-long area of swamps and mountainous jungle separates Panama and Colombia. There is no road, no police or military. The inhabitants are tribes, guerrillas and drug traffickers. Solution: Ship the car from Panama to Colombia, and go myself in a small plane over the jungle. Pray that no emergency landings are required.

• Africa: Visas for Chad and Sudan are difficult to obtain, making west-to-east travel impossible. I’ll need to get through Angola, but again, visas are hard to get. In Nigeria, I’ll have to worry about kidnapping, carjacking, roadblock robberies and other violent crimes. Solution: Get a visa for Angola in South Africa, my first stop on the continent, and get across trouble spots like Nigeria as quickly as possible.

• Iran: Once inside the country, no problem. Great place, nice people, few incidents reported by travelers. But I worry about arguments between countries that could lead to border closings.
Solution: Get my visa in order and hope my government doesn’t get too excited about political events before I get there.

• Pakistan: Suicide bombings. Taleban insurgents. Imagine how much fun it will be to cross this country with New York license plates. Solution: Go as fast as possible, perhaps with the military escort some foreigners use when driving overland. I’m told the soldiers drive like New York cabbies.

• Asia: China makes overland travel expensive by requiring you to hire a government-approved “guide” to take with you. Myanmar’s borders are closed to overland travel. Solution: Ship the car from India or Bangladesh to Thailand or Singapore.

Accommodations
In order to afford a year on the road, there’s little choice but camping. I wish I could say I have no problem with scorpions in my shoes, and that whenever I catch a snake, I’m happy to have it for breakfast, but I can’t. After some research, I discovered most overlanders in Africa use a rooftop tent. The cheapest are expensive at $850, but they let you sleep anywhere, out of the mud, and they pop up in minutes.

Other equipment: fridge for the car, stove that runs on unleaded gasoline, lanterns, water cans, small pop-up tent with portable toilet and shower. Added costs: $800.

The car
There are not many choices when it comes to choosing a car for such journeys. In my opinion, only two vehicles can make it, Toyota Land Cruisers and British-made Land Rover Defenders. Both are tough, and you can find spare parts on all continents. Others, including American makes, are good quality, but you can’t find parts everywhere. Land Cruisers are used by the UN and other non-governmental organizations around the world. Thanks to the economic crisis and the abundance of used cars available, I got a clean 1996 LC with 92,000 miles for less than $7,000.

I can no longer count how many hours I spent getting the LC ready. I upgraded the suspensions so the truck could handle difficult terrain and carry all the equipment, including tools, extra battery, spare parts, cooking equipment, roof tent, water and gas cans, books and luggage. I installed a drawer system for storage. I upgraded the electrical system to run several devices for days before running out of juice.

Other equipment and modifications included a roof rack, reinforced front bumper, safety devices so people don’t steal my new home, bolting metal plates behind windows in the back to create a secure cargo area for my belongings, and bolting a safe to the frame. Added costs: $3,000. I budgeted $4,000 for repairs on the road, though I hope to use only a fraction of it.

Shipping a car is expensive. I’ll have to do it at least five times, sometimes for 100 miles, sometimes between two continents. Shipping costs: around $7,000, plus $2,000 for my air travel while the car is at sea. Gas will range from 38 cents a gallon in Iran to $7.40 a gallon in Portugal. Add $5,000 for gas.

Health care
This trip requires many vaccinations, some covered by insurance, many not. Getting them all in the US would cost more than $500. So I’ll get some of them in Mexico, my first stop, where it’s cheaper.

Yellow fever vaccination is required for South America and Africa; in fact, you need proof of the shot to get through many borders. The same is true in some African countries for the cholera vaccine. Hepatitis A requires two shots, hepatitis B requires three, so you need to start those early. Sometimes these can be bundled together with typhoid shots.

You need three shots for Japanese encephalitis, which is carried by mosquitoes in rural areas. Tetanus shots last 10 years, so you may need one of those too. Your doctor will advise you to get a shot for rabies. If not, you can get immunized within two days of a bite.

I asked my doctor for a strong antibiotic to take with me, and for a letter authorizing me to carry a syringe in case I need a blood test somewhere and the local needles look shady. There is no malaria vaccine. Pills to prevent infection have side effects, but if you get infected, you can take a heavier dose of the same drug. I’ll also take measures to avoid mosquito bites — repellant, net.
I have a first-aid kit and if I need medical care, I’ll go to local doctors and hope it won’t cost much. I bought insurance in case a super-bad event requires evacuation. It would not be helpful to survive an accident only to have a heart attack when I receive a huge bill for evacuation to my home country. I found a policy from InsuranceToGo.com that should run around $600 for the year with a $500 deductible.

Budget
My estimated total for the trip is $46,000, including car and tent; shipping the car five times while flying myself; gas and repairs; insurance and vaccinations. Other costs include $550 for visas; $300 for maps and guidebooks; $10 a day for food and $4,000 for campgrounds and occasional nights in hotels. I plan on spending less, bur prefer to take unforeseen events into account.
And that’s it. I leave Nov. 15. Time to start a new episode of my life. - AP

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Career Opportunities in Sharjah University

The University of Sharjah is one of the leading academic institutions in the Middle East and the Gulf region The University offers academic programs in a large number of disciplines including the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Medical and Health Sciences, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Business, Communications, Law and Islamic Studies and Fine Arts and Design.

Endowed by a fabulous campus and world class facilities, the University places strong emphasis on quality education and outstanding student experience. Thanks to its global vision and comprehensive range of academic and research programs at the undergraduate and post-graduate levels, the University attracts highly motivated students from the UAE, Gulf States as well as international students from many other countries.

The University is situated within the prominent Sharjah University City. Students, faculty and staff at the University of Sharjah participate fully around the year in the dynamic and vibrant academic activities and rich cultural life of the Emirate of Sharjah and the United Arab Emirates. They also enjoy the scenic surrounding nature with its captivating dessert environment and proximity to the active city life and beautiful beaches of Sharjah, Dubai, and Ajman.

You can visit the Arabic Site to view the vacancies available at Sharia, Humanities and Law Colleges.

Click Here

Leadership positions
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
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Leadership positions
Dean of the College of Graduate Studies and Scientific Research
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UoS Job Opportunities

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Assistant Professor B/1/10/2009
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Associate Professor /Full Professor B/2/10/2009
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Assistant/Associate / Full Professor of Management in the Department of Management, Marketing & Public Administration B/3/10/2009
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Assistant/Associate / Full Professor of Management in the Department of Management, Marketing & Public Administration. B/4/10/2009
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Dental Technician D/1/10/2009
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Lecurer in Prosthodontic D/2/10/2009
Category: Faculty Members College of Dentistry
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Assistant or Associate Professor in Electrical Engineering
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Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
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Assistant, Associate Professor or Professor in Computer Engineering
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Assistant, Associate Professor or Professor in Computer Engineering
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Lecturer in Industrial Engineering
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Department: Industrial Engineering & Management
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Assistant or Associate Professor in Industrial Engineering
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Department: Industrial Engineering & Management
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Assistant or Associate Professor in Industrial Engineering
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Assistant or Associate Professor in Industrial Engineering
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Lecturer in Computer Science and Information Technology
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All ranks in Computer Science and Information Technology
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All ranks in Computer Science and Information Technology
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All ranks in Computer Science and Information Technology
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Lecturer Mathematics
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Associate or Assistant Professor Statistics
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Lecturer Microbiology & Molecular Biology
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Assistant or Associate Prof./ Genetics & Molecular Biology
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Institutional Effectiveness Officer
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Statistical Analyst
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Web developer
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Classrooms Technology Technician
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Security Administrator
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Telecommunication Administrator
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Cost Accountant F/1/10/2009
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Department: Finance
Closing Date: 11/25/2009 12:00 AM
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